To Buy Or Not To Buy: Edison Collier in Antique Marble

Edison Collier in Antique Marble

I suspect you’re familiar with this internal (and ETERNAL) battle. See pretty pen. Want pretty pen.

Problem is, you only have two hands (and really, only one that can write anything), and way more pens than hands. Way more. Like, you’re on your way to becoming one of those people with goat paths that lead from one cluttered room to another. The pens, I’ve noticed, tend to pile up.

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But, GAH, you want this pen. So the angel and devil both start whispering in opposite ears, each trying to outmaneuver the other.

“But it’s so pretty!”

“You have enough pens!”

“It will make my life complete!”

“Um, no.”

“But everybody’s getting one!”

“And if everybody jumped off a bridge, would you do that?!” [Funny how your brain digs up these little beauties from your childhood.]

The ping-ponging conversation continues until you’re exhausted by indecision. But, oh, how that pen speaks to you!

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Such was the scenario when I saw this slightly used Edison Collier in Antique Marble on Gary Varner’s former Notegeist site.

I did my best to look away, but I couldn’t unsee that pen.

I appealed to my sense of reason. I already own an Edison Collier in Persimmon Swirl. (Talk about a looker!) AND, I already own an Edison Pearl in Antique Marble. So neither the model nor material were new to me.

I really DID do my best to ignore it, thinking that someone else would snap it up and make the decision moot. But no one did.

The price, I should mention, was excellent. A real steal. I stewed and rationalized and waffled in both the “buy” and “don’t buy” directions. I burned brain power and calories thinking about this, so strenuous was my thinking.

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You’re smart. You know how this particular tale turns out. I bought the pen.

The price was too good. The pen, too gorgeous. The Antique Marble acrylic is slightly translucent and beautifully swirled. There’s chatoyancy and depth and glow. The colors are my colors.

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The fine nib writes wonderfully. Upon receipt, I filled it with Montblanc JFK Blue Navy, and have been writing letters and journal entries with it often. I do not regret this purchase.

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But sometimes I don’t buy the pen. And this year I’m going to do my best to do what I said I was going to do LAST year- to be happy with what I already have. To USE what I already have.

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To buy or not to buy. That will always be the question.

 

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16 thoughts on “To Buy Or Not To Buy: Edison Collier in Antique Marble

  1. I know that internal battle well!

    Sometimes, as in this case, it’s enough for me to simply know a pen exists!

    This pen is in good hands.

    (Let me know when you start thinning the collection, wink, grin, wink.)

  2. Tell me about it Mary… I quit buying last year, too. But somehow just purchased TWO Pelikan M800’s today. It’s an addiction, I tell ya.

  3. Ahhhhhhhhh!!!!!

    That’s the pen that I agonized over, placed in a cart twice, stopped myself, and then, when I finally broke down to buy it, was gone.

    I was a little relieved about it being gone. 🙂

    It’s fun to know that someone was going through the exact same torture!

  4. In the immortal words of Hamstrung:
    “To buy, or not to buy — that is the question.
    Whether ’tis nobler to the purse to suffer
    The slurs and insults of outrageous bounty
    Or to take charge against a sea of come-ons
    And by ignoring, fend them.”

  5. “I filled it with Montblanc JFK Blue Navy, and have been writing letters and journal entries with it often. I do not regret this purchase.”

    What’s the dollar value of the joy it’s brought you? I’d claim: Valuable enough!

  6. Pingback: Link Love: Looking Forward, Looking Back | The Well-Appointed Desk

  7. I’m going through the very same thing for the very same pen. But I just had $1100 worth of dental work done. So I don’t think I can justify it right now. Sigh. I must take comfort in my other two Edisons, as well as my Sailors, Pilots, THINKs, Pelikans, Lamys, Parkers, and Sheaffers.

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