So I picked up a broad……..nib.

Never say never. Though I thought I would forever be an extra-fine/fine woman (we’re talking nibs here), watching all of those SBREBrown pen review videos (that man loves him some B, BB, and even BBB nibs), and receiving letters from friends who swear by juicy, fat nibs, I cracked. I had to explore.

VP Raden with broad nib

Goulet Pens recently ran a “Spring Cleaning” 20% off promotion on a number of items, including the Pilot Vanishing Point nib units. What a perfect time to branch out a bit. When the broad VP nib unit arrived, I popped it into my beloved and sparkly Raden VP (thanks, Dan!), loaded it from a sample vial of Noodler’s Turquoise (thanks, Joe!), pulled out some Tomoe River paper and let it fly.

Hoo boy. VERY nice.

I kind of get it now. Maybe I MORE THAN get it now.

VP Raden with broad nib

While I won’t be using broad nibs for my everyday writing— my handwriting is just too small for that— I can totally see myself transitioning to them for letter writing, when I can use my Tomoe River or Clairfontaine Triomphe paper, and when I really like seeing how an ink shades.

Granted, the Vanishing Point broad is, since it’s Japanese, more like a European medium, but still. I’d stepped away from my comfort zone and had to admit that it felt…well…comfortable. Wonderfully smooth. Nicely juicy.

(This keeps sounding dirty and I DO NOT MEAN FOR THAT TO BE HAPPENING.)

Raden VP with broad nib

Getting back to my point (and my G-rating), all I’m trying to say is that it’s cool to take a pen body that you love, and swap in some different nibs for a completely different writing experience. The VPs are great for this, as are, of course, Lamys and TWSBIs. I see that Richard Binder offers Vanishing Point pen bodies (even the new metallics) separately, so I may go that route when I decide to spring for the cool looking green metallic. That’ll save me about $60. Since I own a range of nib units to swap in, why buy another complete pen?

VP nib unit and Lamy nib

When I ordered the broad VP nib unit, I also picked up a Lamy broad nib as these are crazy easy to swap in and out of several Lamy pen models. And when I recently purchased my Edison Nouveau Premiere Cherry Blossom with a medium nib, I tossed a fine and a 1.1 mm stub into my shopping cart, as well. One gorgeous looking pen, three different writing options.

So have fun. Experiment. With nibs, I mean.

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13 thoughts on “So I picked up a broad……..nib.

  1. Yea! Sounds like you had fun and the shading on those words look absolutely luscious. I was debating the other day on buying a cursive italic nib for my Pelikan…if I can find one at .65mm or smaller, I’m sold!

  2. I was always a medium kind of guy. I ventured out to Fine and Extra Fine once and like them but tend to reach for my mediums more often. I like a broad and how it can put a extra level of smoothness on a nib, even if it’s perceived, by just more ink flowing. My to do list is on wide ruled paper so my less than stellar handwriting can tolerate a broad nib there and still be readable. It’s fun to see the big bold lines and how the ink shines,

  3. I definitely was more of a fine/medium person at first, and I do still enjoy writing with those pens, but I have quite a few broad nibs now as well, including my new broad Tropical Purple VP, which I adore.

  4. I love your writing, and these photos are gorgeous! You’re tempting me to branch out from my F and EF nibs… especially with such a lovely shading ink…

  5. Pingback: Too fine?! The Pilot Metropolitan/Lizard/Fine nib | From the Pen Cup

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